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BOOM. Yoga Revelation. And E2.

I had an awesome bikram yoga class today. I was focused, working hard, and did an awesome job. And during this fantastic class, I had a moment of clarity: These NaBloPoMo posts are getting boring. So I’m ditching them. SEE YA.

Now on to something fun– FOOD. Mr. Beez and I took our friends Christine and Trav out to E2 for a birthday brunch.

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I’ve been meaning to go there for ages, and was thrilled that Christine selected it. I’ve heard that the wait there can be hours long, so we went on the early side (10am). The dining room is very tiny, and can seat maybe 20-25 people. They have a nice big party room downstairs, where we sat and drank coffee while we waited for our table to open up. Even though the seating in the downstairs area are big communal tables, it would be really nice if they would open this area up for more brunch seating.

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E2 is BYOB.  And brunch isn’t brunch without mimosas.

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E2′s menu changes continuously, and this week’s menu was full of fresh winter vegetables and comfort foods.

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But there is also a standing menu of sweet and savory beignets.  These savory zeppoli (with pepper and cheese) were my favorite part of this delicious meal, and the caramel nut beignets were a close second.  I’m not much of a doughnut fan, but E2′s fried dough made my tastebuds sing.

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I ordered the butternut squash frittata.  On the whole it was delicious, but it could have used just a little kick.  I think it would have been perfect if there were some spicy sausage mixed in, or maybe I should have tried topping it with a bit of sriracha. That being said, it was still tasty, and I would not hesitate to order it again.

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Mr. Beez also happily devoured his omelette.  Our meals were hearty and reasonably priced.  I was glad that we did not get stuck with a terrible wait, and the servers were nice an attentive during our little wait.  E2 is a gem in Highland Park’s cute little business district.
E2 on Urbanspoon

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NaBloPoMo Day 9: Administrative Assistant

I work most weekends, but hardly ever spend my weekends in the office. Usually, I can get my work done from home. On the weekends that really do require my presence in the workplace, Mr. Beez and I can usually sort things out so that he’s at home with Baby Beez when I’m at work, and vice versa. Some weekends don’t work out that way, and the final result is a field trip for Baby Beez.

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I’m involved in a big filing for tomorrow, and the degree of coordination required meant I needed to be in the office.  (And yes, I really DID have to use the Bluebook today.)  Mr. Beez also had obligations, so Baby Beez visited work with me. She watched Finding Nemo 1 and a half times, she wrote all over some scratch paper (pens are fascinating to her right now), she looked out the window, she ate some pretzels, and she threw some papers around. There was no screaming and no flailing, and I DID get my work done, so all in all it was a success.

When I was young, my mom worked at my school, so going to work with her was not a novelty.  My dad is an operating room nurse, and he once took me on a little tour of the OR, and I even got to watch a heart surgery (and by watch, I meant spent the time in a corner, holding onto a wall, trying not to pass out or be sick).  It was about the coolest thing my little self go to do.  I love it that our county has a big “Take Your Kids to Work” program at the courts, and can’t wait until Baby Beez is big enough to participate.  I am not pushing her to be a lawyer, but I do think it’s important to understand what Mommy is doing during those long hours away.

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NaBloPoMo Day 8: Workplace LOLs

passive aggressive

Passive aggressive notes in MY workplace send me into fits of blind rage.  I’m fortunate to work with people who are not too bad of offenders when it comes to this nonsense, but every once in a while there is a doozy.  Passive aggressive notes make me nuts because they either (1) deal with some task that there already IS someone responsible for handling, they’re just not doing it, and oh by the way, the person who wrote the note usually IS the person responsible for whatever task it is, they’re just trying to shove it off onto the general office populace, or (2) deal with some issue of common courtesy, and if the target of the note doesn’t get it to begin with, the note isn’t going to get through to them anyway.

On the contrary, I LOVE passive aggressive notes from other peoples workplaces.  Especially ones harping on some trivial matter and are misspelled. Boy do I love the misspelled ones.  So my guilty pleasure that I share with you today is PassiveAggressiveNotes.com  Love it love it love it. And I hope not to see my office on there anytime soon.

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NaBloPoMo Day 7: Chillin out Maxin’ Relaxin all Cool

What is the best way to relax after a hard day?

lolcatbaddayI’m easy to please.  All I ask for relaxing is to just do something (or nothing) that is not work.  Usually this takes the form of ordering a pizza for dinner and hanging out on the couch with my family and the TV on.  Or maybe it means coffee and magazines.  But it usually is just some form of me sitting around.  On really bad days, I’m sitting around with a glass of wine.

In an ideal world, I’d say that after a hard day, I relax by going for a run or some other athletic activity, but in all honesty after most days I’m too beat to do much else than just sit there.  Since getting a Kindle, I have been reading every single night before bed.  This means both that I have read nearly 40 “fun” books this year alone, but also that I manage to slow my mind down enough that I can sleep through the night.

Hanging out with my family does make me feel a million percent better when I’ve had a bad day.  I spend my days doing work that is hard.  Law is complex and uncertain and confusing.  Sometimes (often) the practice of law feels like I’m picking my way through landmines.  And the stress is even more exacerbated because you are responsible for solving someone else’s problems.  So if you set off one of those landmines, you’ve blown it for both you and them.  (If it’s not already painfully obvious, this hasn’t been a great week.)

You know what’s not hard? Parenting.  People say parenting is hard, but it’s not.  It is very frustrating and very exhausting and full of unwinnable battles, but it is not hard.  And hanging out with my kid after a hard day makes me feel a little better, because it’s pretty darn hard to truly screw up this parenting thing.

Also, ice cream.

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NaBloPoMo Day 6: Working hard or hardly working?

How hard do you think you work?

wurkkitteh

Although I can rattle off the number of my billable hours completed this year with precision, I find it hard to judge whether I create an impression of diligence or laziness.  My work ethic is the most important career-related value to me.  The biggest compliment I could receive is to be thanked for working hard.  One of my biggest fears at work is that I am afraid of being perceived as lazy or not holding up my share of the work.
My attention (bordering at times of paranoia) on this quality has apparently kept me focused and working hard enough that in my annual review, my highest marks were in the “work ethic” category.  But high marks does not mean I can rest easy.  Only because I’ve been so determined to be, and to be known as, hardworking have I established that reputation for myself.

I probably work harder than lots of people, but there are also lots of people who work harder than me.  Sometimes I think that I can only consider myself hardworking if I work harder than everyone else, like that I can’t think of myself as hardworking at all when there are other people who have it tougher, and are piecing together back-to-back blue collar shifts, 7 days a week, and barely making ends meet.  Or that I can’t consider myself hardworking because I have managed to fit that hard work to my life, for example by leaving work at a reasonable hour but doing work once the baby is in bed, instead of staying in the office until late late at night.

But being “hardworking” isn’t a contest.  There is no limit on the number of people who can be “hardworking.”  And just because someone’s workload is comparatively harder than someone else’s, does not mean that the person with the lesser workload is not “hardworking.”  Comparing gets me nowhere.  I just have to keep at it, keep my hours up, get my work done, and hope that people recognize my efforts.